Hong Kong Extradition Bill Protestors

June 2019



Over the month of June Pro-democracy demonstrators took to the streets of Hong Kong to protest against the Hong Kong Government's controversial extradition bill, which would allow suspected criminals to be sent to the Chinese mainland to stand trial and place its citizens at risk of extradition to China. Nearly 2 million people, almost one third of the city took to the street in peaceful protest on June 16th. Protests continue with the Government refusing to withdraw the bill. 

Big Uncle Wong, 95, a farmer in the New Territories, Hong Kong, and a veteran of the Tiananmen Square protests. Uncle Wong was born in mainland China but escaped China to Hong Kong during the Cultural revolution, "I saw what happened in 1989, I wanted to support the students then and I support the students now. Beijing wants Hong Kong to be the same as mainland, they want Hong Kongers to be the same as mainlanders, they want the Hong Kongers to think that same was as mainlanders, they want Hong Kongers to only praise them and not critisize them but when they are so nasty why would people do what you say." 

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Perry, 15, one of the protestors against the Hong Kong Government's controversial extradition bill. "We can't trust the judicial system of China and have to stand here to defend our rights of freedom. Bring back our Hong Kong."

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Miss Ho, known as Fat Sister, a sales assistant one of the protestors against the Hong Kong Government's controversial extradition bill. "I am unhappy with the government, everything they have done since the handover in 1997 has been terrible. Students can't get into university here as only two out of ten spaces go to Hong Kong people, the rest go to mainlanders. What are they supposed to do? Xi (President Xi Jinping) is acting like Mao. Mao got people to fight themselves and fear each other and that's what Xi is doing right now and I don't want the young generation to live like that." 

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Lau, 17, a secondary school student and one of the protestors against the Hong Kong Government's controversial extradition bill. "I'm here because on 12th June the police used too much violence on a peaceful demonstration and they have to apologise for their actions." 

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Abraham, 38, a social worker and legislative aid to Eddie Chu, one of the protestors demonstrating against the Hong Kong Government's controversial extradition bill. "The protests are full of Love, it is touching and I want us to continue in this spirit and build a community based on Love and respect for each other in Hong Kong."

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Tammy, 63, a house wife and one of the protestors against the Hong Kong Government's controversial extradition bill. "On the 9th of June I came out and marched demanding the withdrawal of the law but the government have refused to listen to us. We saw what happened on the 12th June and our hearts hurt, so we did what we could to get everyone on the streets on the 16th, my whole family came out. On the surface it seems like it shouldn't effect me, a housewife, but I know better. I know it will directly effect the whole economic environment of the city and change our ability to speak out, a loss of our freedom of speech." 

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Christy, 22, a university student and one of protestors demonstrating against the Hong Kong Government's controversial extradition bill. "I have to protect our home and the young ones. I was there at the umbrella movement 5 years ago and was one of the young ones then, I just want to give my experience to help those now. 2 million people have marched and the government have given no response. Carrie Lam (Hong Kong Chief Executive) does not pay any attention to it and I am frustrated by it and angered how the police treat the demonstrators." 

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Eddie, 42, a hair stylist and one of the protestors against the Hong Kong Government's controversial extradition bill. "I have come out this time because ever since 2014 Hong Kong has entered a period where people feel discouraged but this time I saw how many people are determined and also what they are willing to do, so I came out too. This event has brought people back together and even people don't feel they can get their demands met they still need to come out."

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Minnie, 34, a university lecturer and one of the protestors against the Hong Kong Government's controversial extradition bill. Minnie, a mainlander from Shanghai, undertook a hunger strike in protest on the 12th June for 90 hours before collapsing and being admitted into hospital. She was discharged and went straight to the march on the 16th. "I consider Hong Kong my second home, I have seen waht has been happening here and it is the second time in my life that I have witnessed the restriction of freedom of speech, and being deprived of a local identity. I don't want Hong Kong to suffer the same pain as Shanghai did." 

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Lo, 17, a student and one of the protestors against the Hong Kong Government's controversial extradition bill. "I want to stand up for the place I was born in and feel that Hong Kong is becoming mainland China."

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